The TBR Pile | Starting At The Bottom

Photo by Gaelle Marcel

Years ago I would write my TBR list -that stands for To Be Read for any of you who don’t read too many book blogs. Don’t worry, I just discovered the acronym not too long ago – on a sheet a paper that I would then tack up on my wall as a reminder. Sometimes I can still feel a slight cramp in my writing hand when I think back to writing down every single book I wanted to read. Thank goodness I discovered Goodreads! Now my TBR pile is growing rapidly all with a simple click on the ol’ trackpad! It’s amazing how technology changes things. (:

But one thing I’ve noticed as I kept adding books to my list, is how many of the older books I have neglected. There are books on there that I added 9 years ago to read! 9 YEARS! Some of the titles are unfamiliar to me now while others had me slapping myself in a I-can’t-believe-I-still-haven’t-read-that-book kind of way.

Below are the five books that have been on my TBR list the longest, and the ones I’m determined to read this year!

1.)  A Mango-Shaped Space by Wendy MassMia Winchell appears to be a typical kid, but she’s keeping a big secret—sounds, numbers, and words have color for her. No one knows, and Mia wants to keep it that way. But when trouble at school finally forces Mia to reveal her secret, she must learn to accept herself and embrace her ability, called synesthesia, a mingling of the senses.

2.)  The Book of Tomorrow by Cecelia Ahern: Tamara Goodwin has always lived in the here and now, never giving a second thought to tomorrow. Until a traveling library arrives in her tiny village, bringing with it a mysterious, large leather-bound book locked with a gold clasp and padlock.
What she discovers within the pages takes her breath away and shakes her world to its core.
A mesmerizing storing about how tomorrow can change what happens today…

3.)  The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows: January 1946: London is emerging from the shadow of the Second World War, and writer Juliet Ashton is looking for her next book subject. Who could imagine that she would find it in a letter from a man she’s never met, a native of the island of Guernsey, who has come across her name written inside a book by Charles Lamb….
As Juliet and her new correspondent exchange letters, Juliet is drawn into the world of this man and his friends—and what a wonderfully eccentric world it is. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society—born as a spur-of-the-moment alibi when its members were discovered breaking curfew by the Germans occupying their island—boasts a charming, funny, deeply human cast of characters, from pig farmers to phrenologists, literature lovers all.
Juliet begins a remarkable correspondence with the society’s members, learning about their island, their taste in books, and the impact the recent German occupation has had on their lives. Captivated by their stories, she sets sail for Guernsey, and what she finds will change her forever.

4.) Hotel on The Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford: In 1986, Henry Lee joins a crowd outside the Panama Hotel, once the gateway to Seattle’s Japantown. It has been boarded up for decades, but now the new owner has discovered the belongings of Japanese families who were sent to internment camps during World War II. As the owner displays and unfurls a Japanese parasol, Henry, a Chinese American, remembers a young Japanese American girl from his childhood in the 1940s–Keiko Okabe, with whom he forged a bond of friendship and innocent love that transcended the prejudices of their Old World ancestors. After Keiko and her family were evacuated to the internment camps, she and Henry could only hope that their promise to each other would be kept. Now, forty years later, Henry explores the hotel’s basement for the Okabe family’s belongings and for a long-lost object whose value he cannot even begin to measure. His search will take him on a journey to revisit the sacrifices he has made for family, for love, for country.

5.) The Red Umbrella by Christina Diaz Gonzalez: In 1961, two years after the Communist revolution, Lucía Álvarez still leads a carefree life, dreaming of parties and her first crush. But when the soldiers come to her sleepy Cuban town, everything begins to change. Freedoms are stripped away. Neighbors disappear. Her friends feel like strangers. And her family is being watched.
As the revolution’s impact becomes more oppressive, Lucía’s parents make the heart-wrenching decision to send her and her little brother to the United States—on their own.
Suddenly plunked down in Nebraska with well-meaning strangers, Lucía struggles to adapt to a new country, a new language, a new way of life. But what of her old life? Will she ever see her home or her parents again? And if she does, will she still be the same girl?



What books have been on your TBR list the longest? Got a Goodreads account? Let’s be friends, so we can encourage each other to read more!


*All book summaries are from Goodreads!

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